Humanizing Art & Technology

Jason J. Ferguson

USA

Jason J. Ferguson

USA

Biography

Jason J Ferguson uses humor, the uncanny, and an absurdist voice to create public interventions, performance works, videos, and sculptural objects. Ferguson’s psychologically charged installations have been said to raise issues of artistic control, consciousness, and mortality. In his work private space becomes public, the ethereal becomes tangible, and the obvious becomes obscure. Ferguson has exhibited internationally including exhibitions in Tokyo, Hong Kong, Berlin, São Paulo, and Tirana; as well as nationally in Brooklyn, Chicago, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Kansas City, Cincinnati, and Detroit. Notable venues include the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit (MoCAD), the Delaware Contemporary, the Institute of Contemporary Art Philadelphia, Brooklyn’s BRIC, and the International Museum of Surgical Science in Chicago. He was an Artist in Residence at Elsewhere Artist Collaborative in 2007 and Kunst in Kolderveen, the Netherlands in 2008. Ferguson speaks widely about his work through public lectures and events. He has been featured in a variety of publications including SCULPTURE Magazine, Hyperallergic, SciArt Magazine, Artifizz, the Chicago Art Review, the 3D Additivist Cookbook, among others. Jason currently resides in Michigan where he is a Professor in the School of Art & Design at Eastern Michigan University.

 

ARTWORK

Artifact
Installation

The works created for artifact reflect a deeper investigation into topics that Ferguson has explored throughout his career. Recurring themes in his studio include corporeal existence, the use of monotonous and repetitive action to embody time, and the replication, manipulation, and recontextualization of familiar objects to create uncanny experiences. This collection of small sculptures captures poetic moments from the sheltered and repetitive routine of life during a global pandemic. Each fragment was created by taking hundreds of photographs of seemingly mundane compositions in his home. The photogrammetry process became an act of seeing rather than looking; of paying closer attention to the quiet, often overlooked, arrangements of objects in space. The ruptured, incomplete forms highlight the limitations of software and speak of focus, memory, and loss. This is an ongoing project with no determined end.

 

Link to artwork:

https://www.jasonjferguson.com/work/artifact